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 Growing squash vertically

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Dawn



Posts : 40
Join date : 2011-05-09
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Growing squash vertically   Mon May 09, 2011 12:24 pm

I grow squash "the old fashioned way" in my garden, but would like to try to grow it vertically on a trellis or in a cylinder-shaped cage like the one shown in the video below.

I would love to hear about others' experiences growing squash (or cucumbers or gourds) this way. Does it work as well as letting the squash plant sprawl across the garden? Do the plants produce the same amount this way?

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Floyd
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Posts : 104
Join date : 2011-05-03
Location : UK

PostSubject: Re: Growing squash vertically   Mon May 09, 2011 9:02 pm

Thanks to severe space limitations (city livin and all) Ive not been able to attempt these types of veg so far but this could be a solotion. Thanks for posting.
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MorningSong

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Join date : 2011-05-18
Age : 55
Location : Lombardy, Italy

PostSubject: Re: Growing squash vertically   Fri May 20, 2011 7:54 pm

Hey Dawn! I would highly advise everyone to grow running or creeping crops vertically - the veggies/fruit don't get dirty, they don't have a flat side or rot from laying on the ground and... it leaves you with a lot more space to plant other crops.

I've grown vertically for years: cukes, butternut squash, mellons, pumpkins even... and I find that the yield is wonderful. Also, the harvesting is sooooo much easier!

Here's a Genovese Squash with a cuke (I think) beside it getting ready to go verticle in my garden now:



That's Swiss Chard back behind the "runners" and 3 Zucchini Squash in the far back.
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Dawn



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Join date : 2011-05-09
Location : Canada

PostSubject: Re: Growing squash vertically   Sun May 22, 2011 3:49 am

That is so great, MorningSong! Thank you for posting a picture, too. Do you simply use heavy wire wrapped around poles for the support? I would love to try this next year.
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olgraybear



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Join date : 2011-05-18

PostSubject: Re: Growing squash vertically   Sun May 22, 2011 1:52 pm

MorningSong wrote:
Hey Dawn! I would highly advise everyone to grow running or creeping crops vertically - the veggies/fruit don't get dirty, they don't have a flat side or rot from laying on the ground and... it leaves you with a lot more space to plant other crops.

I've grown vertically for years: cukes, butternut squash, mellons, pumpkins even... and I find that the yield is wonderful. Also, the harvesting is sooooo much easier!

Here's a Genovese Squash with a cuke (I think) beside it getting ready to go verticle in my garden now:



That's Swiss Chard back behind the "runners" and 3 Zucchini Squash in the far back.


Excellent post and pic Morningsong, great use of all of your available space.

I too have a system that I would love to share with all here. It's highly adaptable for expansion for further use if you should desire. It's as simple as four post, spaced as far apart as you desire, I did 10 feet, and then I made 6"x8" troughs, similar to long window boxes and bolted them on the post with the top one 4 1/2 feet high. Then I put another one on both sides of the first one 6 inches lower, like steps, giving 30 feet of planting space. With the four post, I put the troughs on three of the post, leaving one side open to be able to walk inside the 10 foot square design. For me with just this design, I have a minimum of 120 feet of grow area, in a 10 foot square space. 10 feet on the ground, and 30 feet between each post above ground.
The benefeits of this design allows one to allow plants to hang over the sides, or attach netting, twine, or fencing and train beans, peas, cukes etc. to grow up the supports. With three troughs staggered, you can bring vining crops up to the troughs from the ground , down from the troughs without need for supports, or up with supports, or any combination of all.
I will try to get a pic or at least a drawing to give everyone and idea and maybe adapt it for theirselves. In just one ten foot row, I have a minimum of 40 feet of growing space, with unlimited possibilites.
For example, with tomatoes, if you allow them to grow draping over the edge, theres no need for tie-ing, or staking giving them less physical contact from people and critters and not touching dirt avoiding disease. Which I do everything organic, no commercial chemical pestisides, insectisides. It is necessary for an insect population with good bugs, to control the bad bugs. Naturally. (Plus companion planting)
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MorningSong

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Age : 55
Location : Lombardy, Italy

PostSubject: Re: Growing squash vertically   Mon May 23, 2011 3:45 am

olgraybear, I am trying to visualize in my mind what you are describing, but my brain just won't help me out here. Could you post a picture so I can have a better idea of what your posts and troughs look like? Pretty please?

Dawn, in the past, as a support for my verticle garden, I have used old electrical metal piping: three 2 and a half meter long straight pieces joined with elbow joints as a permenent fixture.

Right now, I am using an otherwise unused metal gazibo frame a friend gave me. I will be able to break it down, fold it up and store it at season's end.

I use nylon cord to make my netting for my verticle frames. You can buy ready-made netting. I personally wouldn't use metal wire because I would think that it might cut into the plants stems, but I may be wrong. I just have never used metal wire for this.

Here are two really good videos:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QqN8ddNlMrU&feature=related

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMzjsCDJ7Hw&feature=related
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olgraybear



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Join date : 2011-05-18

PostSubject: Re: Growing squash vertically   Wed May 25, 2011 2:55 pm

Hey there Morningsong,

We're getting pounded again tonight with storms, yuck, makes it real hard to garden.

But yes, it would be my pleasure to send you a pic of what I'm trying to descibe. No prob.
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olgraybear



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Join date : 2011-05-18

PostSubject: Re: Growing squash vertically   Thu Jul 28, 2011 7:18 am

Hey there MorningSong,

I would really appreciate your wisdom and help!

What would you suggest for me to use to maintain my organic and natural methods of gardening and be able to control these dad burn squash bugs,

I have to water now due to the hot dry weather and they are out there having a pool party,

I have tried several things, but to no avail its really bugging me,
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MorningSong

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Location : Lombardy, Italy

PostSubject: Re: Growing squash vertically   Thu Jul 28, 2011 7:55 am

Well, Olgraybear, that is a good question because I have never seen a squash bug before that I know of. Not sure, but I'd almost say...we don't have them here where I live (that may be too hopeful, though).

I even had to go google it to see what this critter looks like and edusate myself a bit.

Squash bug alias Anasa tristis
http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/M1208.html

Companion planting or trap cropping (growing the bugs' favorite foods in order to lure them away from your garden crops and into the trap crop where you will catch and destroy them) can provide some controll. Plants that are purported to repel squash bugs to some degree are catnip, tansy, radishes, nasturtiums, marigolds, bee balm and mint. These can be planted near your squash plants with the goal of keeping squash bugs from finding a home in your organic garden.
http://www.life123.com/home-garden/gardening-tips/garden-pests/top-five-ways-to-control-squash-bugs.shtml

I found this commercial organic pesticide commercial link...looks interesting enough.
http://blog.ecosmart.com/index.php/2009/06/16/how-to-destroy-squash-bugs/
The 7 tips for eliminating and preventing the bugs sounds reasonable...

Resistant types of the cuke family: Butternut and Royal Acorn
Moderately Resistant: Sweet Cheese, Green Striped Cushaw
Susceptible: Pink Banana, Black Zucchini
Highly Susceptible and Attractive: Yellow Straightneck, Yellow Crookneck, Hubbard Pumpkin
http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/ENT-120-08.pdf

Diatomaceous earth appears to help a lot.

I'll see what else I can come up with.
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olgraybear



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Join date : 2011-05-18

PostSubject: Re: Growing squash vertically   Sat Jul 30, 2011 2:15 am

Thanks MorningSong,

your assistance is wonderful and I appreciate it.

I'm not sure about other folks around the world, but bugs here can really
become devastating, and quite annoying,

It seems to be getting worse this year, more than others past for some reason
and I truly hate chemical pesticides,

Again, really great info and I shall try these things out and give a holler back
and let you know how they worked out it you would like to know.

Hope your having a great day and some rain, hehe,

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olgraybear



Posts : 19
Join date : 2011-05-18

PostSubject: Re: Growing squash vertically   Mon Aug 01, 2011 10:08 am

I love the idea of companion planting,

at this stage of the garden tho, they will destroy whats there before
the companion plants can work. Thanks again,

Along with the great resources and tips, your information was wonderfully helpfull.

For now, I'm gonna try to use the organic neem oil and a dust buster.
Vacuum them suckers up, haha.

Its great that you don't have this in your garden,

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